Blogs (3) >>
Thu 21 Mar 2024 16:10 - 16:35 at Meeting Rooms B110-112 - Global Chair(s): Joël Porquet-Lupine

The majority of Nigerian high schoolers have little to no exposure to the basics of algorithms and programming. We believe this trajectory should change as programming offers these students, especially those from indigent backgrounds, an opportunity to learn profitable skills and ignite their passions for problem-solving and critical thinking.

AnonCoder is an organization that is dedicated to organizing a free, intensive summer program in Nigeria to teach the basics of algorithms and computer programming to high schoolers. However, the adoption of computer science curriculum has been especially challenging in countries in the global south that face unique challenges—such as unstable power supply, internet service, and price volatility. We design a curriculum that is more conducive to the local environment while incorporating rigorous thinking and preparation. Using basic survey designs, we elicit feedback from the students designed to further improve and iterate on our curriculum.

Thu 21 Mar

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15:45 - 17:00
GlobalPapers at Meeting Rooms B110-112
Chair(s): Joël Porquet-Lupine University of California, Davis
15:45
25m
Talk
Computer Science Education - What Can We Learn from Japan?Global
Papers
Markus Sprenger TU Dresden, Nadine Bergner RWTH Aachen University, Thiemo Leonhardt TU Dresden, Ryuta Yamamoto Shizuoka University
DOI
16:10
25m
Talk
[CANCELLED] NaijaCoder: Participatory Design for Early Algorithms Education in the Global SouthCancelledGlobalMSI
Papers
Daniel Alabi Columbia University, Atinuke Adegbile Global Integrated Education Volunteers Association (GIEVA), Lekan Afuye Cornell University, Philip Abel Twilio, Inc., Alida Monaco ICF International
DOI
16:35
25m
Talk
AI Teaches the Art of Elegant Coding: Timely, Fair, and Helpful Style Feedback in a Global CourseGlobal
Papers
Juliette Woodrow Stanford University, Ali Malik Stanford University, Chris Piech Stanford University
DOI