Blogs (3) >>
Thu 21 Mar 2024 14:10 - 14:35 at Meeting Room E145 - Deadlines Chair(s): Tingting Zhu

Office hour utilization in computer science courses can spike near deadlines, producing long wait times, frustrated students, and overworked staff. To address this problem, a large CS1 course implemented a split deadlines policy. Students were randomly divided into two groups with staggered release and due dates. Each group had the same amount of time to complete assignments, but the number of students with each due date was reduced by half. Our study evaluates the effectiveness of this policy. We measure office hour utilization and staff efficiency near deadlines, examine the policy’s impact on student performance, and investigate student perception of the policy’s fairness and efficacy. Overall we found that the split deadline policy increased office hour efficiency, resulted in no significant difference in performance between groups, and was considered fair and effective by students. Our experience report includes reflections and student feedback indicating how to implement and further improve similar policies.

Thu 21 Mar

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13:45 - 15:00
DeadlinesPapers at Meeting Room E145
Chair(s): Tingting Zhu University of Toronto Mississauga
13:45
25m
Talk
Effect of Deadlines on Student Submission Timelines and Success in a Fully-Online Self-Paced Course
Papers
Meng-Chieh Chiu UMass Amherst, Eliot Moss University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Timothy Richards University of Massachusetts Amherst
DOI
14:10
25m
Talk
Implementation of Split Deadlines in a Large CS1 Course
Papers
Hongxuan Chen University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Ang Li University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Geoffrey Challen University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Kathryn Cunningham University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
DOI
14:35
25m
Talk
Student Perspectives on Assignment Deadline Policies in Computer Science Courses
Papers
Joseph Kim Haverford College, Christian Murphy Swarthmore College
DOI